Monday, August 07, 2017

Jay binged Lost in Oz Season 1


It feels like forever ago when the pilot episode of Amazon's original series Lost in Oz (unconnected to any other project to anything that's used that name ever), and then sometime back, they added the next two episodes alongside it to create Lost in Oz: Extended Adventure. Now, Amazon has a complete first season of 13 episodes, 22-23 minutes in length.

After finding a magic journal, a modern-day girl named Dorothy and her dog Toto are taken in their house to the modern land of Oz. The original story of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz happened, but that Dorothy is the great-grandmother of this Dorothy. I don't think the later Oz books by Baum happened in this continuity. There's characters based on the characters from the other books, like an inventor named Tinker, a painter named Smith, a giant Munchkin boy named Ojo whose aspirations go beyond his father's farm, a cowardly lion, a young witch named West, a rag doll named Patches, and a wicked witch named Langwidere (no headswapping, but she is able to make herself look like other people). Ozma and the Wizard don't get mentioned at all. Magic in this Oz is a science based around certain elements, and there's not a ban on it as kids are seen learning it in school. In addition to this, there's the subplot that Dorothy's mother has some idea of what's going on.

The thirteen episode series revolves around a story arc that includes Dorothy wanting to get home as Langwidere tries to take over Oz in a rather interesting manner. (A bit more than "Steal all the magic, take over Oz.") Each episode has a neat mini-arc in its 22-23 minute runtime.

The plots are largely original, using concepts from the books as plot devices rather than plot models (Glinda's lie-detecting pearl that briefly appears in The Marvelous Land of Oz becomes a major item of interest and is called "the Pearl of Pingaree"). The overall story arc is concluded by the end of the final episode, although there is a hook for continuing adventures. (See, Emerald City? That's how you do it.) Animation is excellent, the story is pretty good and enjoyable enough to keep you watching. Those looking for a purist adaptation of the Oz series or a continuation will not find it here, though.

Highly recommended for kids and Oz fans who enjoy different takes on the material.

3 comments:

Angelo Thomas said...

If you *had* to choose between this and "Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz," which do you think is a better show?

Jay said...

Although it also mixed up stuff from the books, I think Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz was a lot more fun and true to the source material, plus the standalone bite-size episode format makes it just generally more easy to watch on its own.

Sam Milazzo said...

I, personally, feel more interest in this original and unique yet respectful series than the WBoomerang one.

I hope to see it someday!